Introduction to the economics of tax policy

Crawford School of Public Policy | Executive course
Economics, Data Analysis and Decision Making

Summary

Governments provide essential services and play an important role in a modern, advanced economy. Paying for government activities requires revenue and this mostly comes from taxation. So what should we tax and how should we tax it? These are the two questions which this course will help you to answer. The course will provide a framework for understanding the costs of taxation and look at the kinds of things that can be taxed (e.g. personal income, land, corporate income) and the types of taxes that might be considered. Attendees will consider the idea of "optimal tax design". The course will give a comprehensive overview and evaluate the current state of Australia’s tax system and explore promising directions for tax reform. Additionally, we will evaluate and discuss current debates around tax and tax reform in Australia.

Course date: 
9.30am–4.30pm 6 March 2019
9.30am–4.30pm 7 March 2019
Venue: 
#132 Crawford Building, Lennox Crossing, ANU
Cost: 

$2,195

Course overview

Participants will learn:

  • Why do we have a tax and transfer system?
  • What is the tax landscape in Australia? Where does our government revenue come from? Are we a high tax country or a low tax country?
  • What are the costs of taxation?
  • Which types of taxes are more or less costly than others?
  • What are the main tax bases? (What are the things that we can tax?)
  • What are the options for taxing those tax bases?

We will draw all this together to answer the following questions:

  • What would an optimal tax system look like?
  • How does Australia’s tax system rate?
  • What are the main priorities for tax reform in Australia?

Course presenter(s)

Professor Robert Breunig

Robert Breunig is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at the Crawford School of Public Policy. From 2015 to 2016 he was the Director of the Crawford School of Public Policy. Professor Breunig is one of Australia’s leading Public Policy Economists. He has published in over 50 international academic journals in economics and public policy. Professor Breunig has made significant policy impact through a number of his research projects: the relationship between child care and women’s labour supply; the effect of immigration to Australia on the labour market prospects of Australians; the effect of switching to cash from food stamps in the U.S. food stamp program and the inter-generational transmission of disadvantage. Professor Breunig’s research is motivated by important social policy issues and debates. His work is characterized by careful empirical study and appropriate use of statistical technique. Professor Breunig’s research agenda has led to many partnerships with government organizations in Australia and overseas. He works regularly with the Australian Treasury, the Department of Employment, the Department of Industry, the Department of Communication and the Arts, the Productivity Commission, the Australian Bureau of Statistics as well as many other agencies. He has been a consultant to the private sector on marketing, mergers, bank competition and customer loyalty programs. Robert Breunig particularly enjoys interaction outside of typical academic circles and takes pleasure in helping those who don’t usually use economics or statistical analysis to better understand and make use of these tools in their work. He has an extensive track record of helping the Australian public service to build research capacity which he views as a particularly important activity.

Robert Breunig is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at the Crawford School of Public Policy. From 2015 to 2016 he was the Director of the Crawford School of Public Policy.

Professor Breunig is one of Australia’s leading Public Policy Economists. He has published in over 50 international academic journals in economics and public policy. Professor Breunig has made significant policy impact through a number of his research projects: the relationship between child care and women’s labour supply; the effect of immigration to Australia on the labour market prospects of Australians; the effect of switching to cash from food stamps in the U.S. food stamp program and the inter-generational transmission of disadvantage.

Professor Breunig’s research is motivated by important social policy issues and debates. His work is characterized by careful empirical study and appropriate use of statistical technique.

Professor Breunig’s research agenda has led to many partnerships with government organizations in Australia and overseas. He works regularly with the Australian Treasury, the Department of Employment, the Department of Industry, the Department of Communication and the Arts, the Productivity Commission, the Australian Bureau of Statistics as well as many other agencies. He has been a consultant to the private sector on marketing, mergers, bank competition and customer loyalty programs.

Robert Breunig particularly enjoys interaction outside of typical academic circles and takes pleasure in helping those who don’t usually use economics or statistical analysis to better understand and make use of these tools in their work. He has an extensive track record of helping the Australian public service to build research capacity which he views as a particularly important activity.

Updated:  24 March 2017/Responsible Officer:  Crawford Engagement/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team