Parental leave and women's skill use on the job

Crawford School of Public Policy | Australia-Japan Research Centre
Tokyo skyline from the Roppongi Hills sky deck

Event details

Seminar

Date & time

Monday 04 December 2017
12.00pm–1.00pm

Venue

Seminar Room 3, Level 1, JG Crawford Building 132, Lennox Crossing, ANU

Speaker

Professor Daiji Kawaguchi, University of Tokyo.

Contacts

Tatsuyoshi Okimoto

University of Tokyo Professor Daiji Kawaguchi presents the final seminar of the AJRC Seminar Series for Semester 2 entitled ‘Parental leave and womens’ skill use on the job: Evidence from PIAAC’. Kawaguchi will analyse the heterogeneous impacts of parental leave policy on women’s skill-use intensity by skill-level, drawing on microdata from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) that covers 30 countries

Most developed countries adopt parental leave policies to promote women’s labour-force participation without sacrificing family formation. Studies find that short-term parental leave increases the time women spent at home and promotes their return to the labour force after childbearing, but some studies point out that long-term parental leave hinders the career advancement of highly skilled women. This paper analyses the heterogeneous impacts of parental leave policy on women’s skill-use intensity by skill-level, drawing on the rich information on individual skill and skill-use intensity available from the microdata of the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) that covers 30 countries. The results show that longer parental leave narrows gender gap in skill-use intensity among less-skilled workers but widens it among highly skilled workers. The finding is robust after controlling for international differences in gender norms and labour-market institutions and allowing for country fixed effects. The findings corroborate the claim that longer parental leave periods suppresses the career advancement of highly skilled women.

Daiji Kawaguchi is Professor of Economics at the University of Tokyo. He received his PhD from Michigan State University in 2002. In addition to his position at University of Tokyo, he is a Research Associate of Tokyo Center for Economic Research and a Research Fellow of IZA. Before joining University of Tokyo faculty in 2016, he was Assistant Professor of Economics at Osaka University (2002-03) and University of Tsukuba (2003-05), and Associate and full Professor at Hitotsubashi University (2005-2016). His research interests lie in empirical microeconomics with particular emphasis on labour economics. His research has been published in various academic journals including Economic Inquiry, Journal of Urban Economics, Journal of Law and Economics, Journal of Money,_ Credit and Banking_, Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Japanese Economic Review and Labour Economics. He is a co-editor of Japanese Economic Review and an associate editor of Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.

A light lunch will be provided.

The AJRC Seminar Series is a forum for researchers to engage on issues relevant to Japan. Topics include, but are not limited to, economics, international relations, politics, and national security. Seminars are typically very frank and early stage studies are most welcome.

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