Rachel Kyte.

Global poor to suffer worst of warming

20 March 2013

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Climate change has the potential to cause devastation to the world’s poor and could undo decades of development hard work, a senior executive from the World Bank has told an audience at Crawford School.

Ms Rachel Kyte, Vice President of the World Bank’s Sustainable Development Network, used her public lecture ‘Climate change: Avoiding a four degree warmer world’ to warn that climate change is more than an issue of policy and science, but one that will affect countless millions of poor people around the world.

She argues that we must avoid the danger of the world warming by four degrees, a threat detailed a recent report commissioned by the World Bank, ‘Turn down the heat – Why a 4 ° warmer world must be avoided

“Climate change threatens to roll back decades of development and it will be the poor in every country who suffer most. We owe it to our children and grandchildren and all future generations to change the current climate trajectory of our planet.”

“Climate change would cause seas to rise 0.5 to 1 metre, dramatically affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of city dwellers; large sections of the world would become much, much hotter, providing huge challenges for growing crops; and extreme weather events that were seen as ‘once in a lifetime’ occurrences could start happening every year.

“Based on the World Bank Group’s work with the poorest to build resilience, we will make sure everything we do takes into account a climate risk.”

Rachel Kyte’s lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre and the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy at Crawford School.

External coverage of Rachel Kyte’s visit to Australia: Radio AustraliaABC NewsABC The World Today

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